RESCUE ADVICE

Kangaroos & Wallabies

Kangaroos and wallabies (Macropods) can run into trouble with cars, pets and illness.

Rescue Tips

  • Macropods can be extremely dangerous, especially when injured! If you come across an injured kangaroo or wallaby don’t approach it. Call our 24/7 Rescue Line on 0418 628 483 immediately  and one of our rescuers will assist as soon as possible.
  • If you can, please stay in the area and keep your eyes on the animal until we arrive. Kangaroos can only be rescued if we can locate them.
  • If you have to leave, mark the area with a bag, some cloth – anything you have on hand helps! Try taking some photos of the area to send to our phone operators or mark the spot on your phone by “dropping a pin”.
  • If you have found a deceased female please check for a joey by gently opening the pouch (see Pouch Checking Guide). If a joey is in the pouch PLEASE DO NOT REMOVE IT. Contact our 24/7 Rescue Line on 0418 628 483 if you haven’t already done so.
  • Check the surrounds. Joeys can also be been bumped out of the pouch, or hiding in nearby bushes. Scan the area for movement and if you find a joey, call the hotline for advice.

If you find a joey

  • What next? If the operator advises you to contain the joey, please keep it in a warm, dark, quiet place e.g. wrapped in a towel or sheet in a ventilated carrier while you transport it to the nearest vet or wait for a rescuer. If you go directly to the vet, please let the Rescue Hotline know which vet you have taken the joey to.
  • Cover with a towel to create a warm environment, and reduces visual stimuli
  • Put the animal somewhere warm, quiet and dark to reduce the stress. This means – no nursing or cuddling; no photos; keeping it away from the TV, pet dog etc.
  • If cold or has no fur, place a hot water bottle (even a drink bottle will do) filled with hot tap water only, wrapped in cloth, next to (never underneath) the joey.

Most common reasons for rescues

  1. Hit by cars
  2. Attack by pets such dog
  3. Entanglement in wire
Eastern Grey Kangaroo

These stoic animals are quintessential Australian icons. They can be found grazing in open areas at dusk and dawn, surrounded by large, multi-generational mobs within which they form undeniable family bonds. Orphaned 'easties' are known to be big sooks, remaining 'babies' until they're well over 10kg. Eastern greys are particularly susceptible to stress related illness, so if you pick up a joey - keeping them in a warm, dark and quiet environment is often life-saving.

Red-necked Wallaby

Rednecked wallabies or "rednecks" are much more compact than any kangaroo. They are distinguishable by their size, reddish fur, a white line along their jaw and black muzzle. Both females and males have this colouring.

Rednecks are one of the cheekiest species in the macropod world. In care, they are pure mischief and are experts at sniffing out trouble. In the wild, these wallabies may hang out in loose groups of a few individuals, but don't form "mobs" like eastern greys.

Swamp Wallaby

If you've ever caught a glimpse of the more reserved swamp wallaby in the wild, lucky you! This species is relatively shy and secretive - living in denser bushland & rainforest understorey. These wallabies are usually solitary - if you're going to go it alone, you have to be smart!

In care, "swampies" are little pocket rockets, and gain independence very quickly.

Common Wallaroo

These stoic animals are quintessential Australian icons. They can be found grazing in open areas at dusk and dawn, surrounded by large, multi-generational mobs within which they form undeniable family bonds. Orphaned 'easties' are known to be big sooks, remaining 'babies' until they're well over 10kg. Eastern greys are particularly susceptible to stress related illness, so if you pick up a joey - keeping them in a warm, dark and quiet environment is often life-saving.

Red-necked Pademelon

Pademelons look a bit like rednecked wallabies if you put them in the dryer for too long. They are another shy, solitary species that forage day and night in dense understorey.

Locally in the Hunter, pademelons can be found in the vicinities of Barrington Tops National Park and Watagans National Park.