A huge Thank You to Wires for supporting and funding Hunter Wildlife Rescue with food for our fauna in care which will also help our carers whom work so hard caring for the fauna. The funding will now allow us to continue the food bank free still to all our approved fauna carers. Wires have donated $12,000 to go towards a WILDIFE FOOD account to be set up so HWR can purchase fauna food through Newcraft a fauna food suppler in Sydney. Also Wires have nominated and were successful in getting 5 Woolworths stores throughout the Hunter to supply free fruit , veggies and meat to help feed the fauna in care with HWR. This is been done under Wires National Food Grant project and we wish to thank Wires for their support and help and to say how grateful we are receiving this funding and support.
A huge Thank You to Wires for a $12,000 Donation for food for fauna in care and successful nomination for supply of food by Woolworths. Thank you Wires!

Official Documents of Hunter Wildlife Rescue

To view a policy or procedure click on the + sign. To close a document click on the – sign.

HWR: Strategic

The policies listed below are for the support of members of Hunter Wildlife Rescue in the operation as a licenced organisaton

Code of Conduct

When acting in the course of activities all members will:

  • Behave honestly and with integrity;
  • Act with care and diligence;
  • Treat each person with courtesy, respect and without harassment, and take reasonable steps to avoid conflict in regards to malicious gossip or /and to the improper use of text messaging and/or email;
  • Comply with all applicable laws and DECC licence conditions;
  • Comply with all NATF Policies and Constitution;
  • Maintain confidentiality and discretion on all NATF matters appropriate to the circumstances;
  • Disclose and take reasonable steps to avoid, conflicts of interest (real or apparent) in connection with NATF activities and positions of office;
  • Recognise and declare any situation which has the potential for a conflict of interest;

The above points are extracts from the Code of Conduct. For a copy of the Code of Conduct click on the link below.

Code of Conduct

Constitution of the Hunter Wildlife Rescue NATF Inc.) December 2015

Part 1 – Preliminary

Definitions
In this constitution:
(i) The name of the association shall be Native Animal Trust Fund Inc trading as Hunter Wildlife Rescue hereinafter referred to as “the association”.
(ii) Director-General means the Director-General of the NSW Office of Fair Trading.
(iii) Ordinary committee member means a member of the committee who is not an office-bearer of the association.
(iv) Secretary means:
(a) the person holding office under this constitution as secretary of the association, or
(b) if no such person holds that office in an acting capacity – the public officer of the association.
(v) the Act means the Associations Incorporation Act 2009.
(vi) the Regulation means the Associations Incorporation Regulation 2010.
In this constitution:
(vii) a reference to a function includes a reference to a power, authority and duty,
(viii) a reference to the exercise of a function includes, if the function is a duty, a reference to the performance of the duty,
(ix) a reference to written notice or signed documentation includes e-correspondence from the members’ registered email address, and
(x) the provisions of the Interpretation Act 1987 apply to and in respect of this constitution in the same manner as those provisions would so apply if this constitution were an instrument made under the Act.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATF Inc) Constitution

Grievance Policy & Procedures and Grievance Form

The Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc) recognises the importance of respecting the contribution of every member and working harmoniously for the benefit and progress of the core purpose of the association– the rescue, rehabilitation and release of injured, orphaned and distressed wildlife in the Hunter Region. It is expected that all members treat one another with respect and abide by the Code Of Conduct and the OEH Code of Practice for Injured, Sick & Orphaned Protected Fauna. This policy aims to address concerns of members and make systemic improvements to the functioning of the Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc).

This Policy covers grievances made to the committee by any person that is a member of the association who:
1.1 Has identified a serious breach of the Code of Conduct/or Code of Practice for Injured, Sick & Orphaned Protected Fauna;
1.2 Has refused or neglected to comply with a provision or provisions of the Code of Conduct, Constitution or Committee directive; or
1.3 Has willfully acted in a manner prejudicial to the interests of the Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc).

A grievance is any allegation of misconduct against a member or group of members made in writing by the aggrieved person or their representative that is likely to bring the organisation into disrepute or cause disruption to the normal conduct of the organisation’s affairs.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Grievance Policy & Procedures

Grievance Form

The Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc) recognises the importance of respecting the contribution of every member and working harmoniously for the benefit and progress of the core purpose of the association– the rescue, rehabilitation and release of injured, orphaned and distressed wildlife in the Hunter Region. It is expected that all members treat one another with respect and abide by the Code Of Conduct and the OEH Code of Practice for Injured, Sick & Orphaned Protected Fauna. This policy aims to address concerns of members and make systemic improvements to the functioning of the Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc).

This Policy covers grievances made to the committee by any person that is a member of the association who:
1.1 Has identified a serious breach of the Code of Conduct/or Code of Practice for Injured, Sick & Orphaned Protected Fauna;
1.2 Has refused or neglected to comply with a provision or provisions of the Code of Conduct, Constitution or Committee directive; or
1.3 Has willfully acted in a manner prejudicial to the interests of the Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFInc).

A grievance is any allegation of misconduct against a member or group of members made in writing by the aggrieved person or their representative that is likely to bring the organisation into disrepute or cause disruption to the normal conduct of the organisation’s affairs.

To download a copy of this policy click on the link below.

Grievance Policy & Procedures

Intellectual Property Policy

1. Definition
1.1 “Intellectual property or ‘IP’ is a legal term used to describe the property of your ‘mind’ resulting from intellectual and creative efforts. It gives legal ownership rights to creators of certain materials.”( Not-for-profit Law Guide Guide to IP A Guide for community organisations in Australia on creating and protecting intellectual property)

1.3. Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATF) intellectual property includes the rights it may have in relation to its:
• name
• logo
• programs or services developed by Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATF)
• publications
• training and support materials
• photographic images of wildlife held under NATF license.
• website design and content
• domain name
• computer applications, programs, or databases it has developed, and
• any ideas, innovations and inventions.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Intellectual Property Policy

Social Media Policy

1. INTENTION OF THIS POLICY

The intention of this policy is to establish a culture of openness, trust and integrity in our online activities that will positively support the rescue and rehabilitation efforts of its volunteer members. It is intended to provide clarity to members and friends of Hunter Wildlife Rescue, Native Animal Trust Fund (NATFInc), on how to conduct themselves in social media. It aims to encourage members to find a voice through social media, be wildlife focused but at the same time protect the interests of its members and the organisation.

2. DEFINTION OF SOCIAL MEDIA

Definition of Social Media may include (but not limited to):

  • social networking sites (e.g. Facebook, Myspace, LinkedIn)
  • video and photo sharing websites (e.g. Flickr, Instagram, YouTube)
  • blogs, including corporate and personal blogs
  • micro-blogging (e.g.Twitter)
  • instant messaging (including SMS)
  • newspapers and magazines

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Social Media Policy

Hunter Wildlife Rescue Members Support Policies

The policies listed below are for the support of members of Hunter Wildlife Rescue who are rescuing, rehabilitating or releasing injured, sick or orphaned wildlife.

Members Support Policy: Wildlife Food Subsidy Guidelines

This program will be implemented at the beginning of each management year (July – June) where a budget will be allocated. Once the budget has been reached the Management Committee will determine if further funding will be available based on the current income and expenditure for the year.

Background

The Food Bank or wildlife food subsidy scheme was established to support members meet the cost of food items associated with rehabilitation of wildlife. Specialised foods are available at subsidised rates. The subsidy is currently 50% if purchased via a Food-Banker (this increased in March 2014 from 30%). Bulk purchasing and NATF GST refunds means members will pay less than purchasing individually. Additional items such as Lectade, Spark and other first aid and rehabilitation items and live foods such as crickets and mealworms, may also be purchased through the Food Bank. In March 2014, the wildlife food subsidy program was expanded to include fish, fruit, meat products and other foods purchased from supermarkets, fish co-ops etc) including fish for birds, fresh fruit for possums, bats, birds and meat for carnivores etc.

The goal of establishing a wildlife food bank is to
• Assist authorised members in the cost of rehabilitating Hunters’ wildlife.
• Strengthen the consistency of fauna data returns as per NATF Inc, Hunter Wildlife Rescue License.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Member Support Policy & Procedures Wildlife Food Subsidy

Members Support Policy: Medicine Supply Guide

1 Introduction

The Hunter Wildlife Rescue (HWR) improvement initiative has nominated specific supplies as ‘medicine’. Medicine supplies will be offered at no charge to rehabilitators with active authority cards for specific Species.
This guide provides a long-term commitment from the HWR committee to support and provide clear guidance on how medicine will be provided and used.
By following simple procedures outlined in this reference guide, you and the committee will be able to take full advantage of the Medicine Supply process.

2 Scope

For the purpose of this process ‘medicine’ is classed as non-food supplies which do not require a prescription. Such as and not limited to Spark, Lectade, Protexin, Impact.

Items which carers use in their own husbandry are out of scope of this process, example, yoghurt, slippery elm bark, honey, various oils and creams.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Medicine Supply Guide 2020

Disaster Team Protocols

Attention All members

As you all know fires and other disasters can happen at any time in our area and the impact on our wildlife is enormous. The NATF Inc Disaster Team is looking to improve communication and information to members at short notice.
The process will be

1. A “DISASTER STANDBY ALERT”

will be emailed to all members, outlining the type of disaster (bushfire, oil spill, heat stress event etc.) and location. At this stage, members are asked to prepare the mandatory safety clothing and equipment listed below. For personal comfort please bring a spare set of clothes and a change of shoes.
For bushfires, the Rural Fire Service is responsible for ensuring the area is safe and at such time will give permission to the Disaster Coordinator to enter the area for search and rescue of injured wildlife (this may be one or more days after the fire).

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Disaster Response Protocols

Disaster Team Protocols for Events in Flying Fox Colonies

1. Background

The primary mass flying-fox incident is a heat stress event. Other disasters include, storms, bushfire and disease outbreaks. Heat stress occurs when temperatures reach extremes in the campsite. Extremes usually mean greater than 40° over more than one day. Cool nights, intervening cool days, rain and cool understories mitigate the situation. High 30s in the days before, wind, lack of understory and disturbance exacerbate the situation.

The aim of this document is to provide the protocol for the following events:

  • Heat-stress,
  • Storm,
  • Bushfire,
  • Flood.

Disease is rare and more complicated and is not covered by this document. The standard NATF Disaster protocol is the parent document for this document and covers all ancillary tasks such as the care of volunteers, media, etc.

There are short form documents for each process described here. They are for quick reference only. This document is the “point of truth” if there are any discrepancies between this document and the quick reference guides.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Disaster Protocols for Disaster Events in Flying-Fox Colonies

Rescuer and Rehabilitator Policy

Rescuers & Rehabilitators will:

  • Undertake Introductory to the NATF training
  • Attend approved rescue/rehabilitation training, including Basic Rescue and Care and any species specific training
  • Implement procedures as outlined in any NATF training for the rescue and rehabilitation of fauna
  • Undertake a minimum three month probationary period of rehabilitating for each species (may be served concurrently)
  • Undertake a minimum three month probationary period of rescuing
  • Abide by the recording and reporting requirements including
  • Maintaining accurate records as required by the General Licence
  • Providing data on a monthly basis to the Database Officer or other species specific database coordinator for Koalas, Flying Foxes and Sea Turtles
  • Reporting all fauna coming into care to the specific species coordinator
  • Maintain up to date knowledge of current trends in fauna management and rehabilitation
  • Undergo retraining if been inactive for two (2) years or more
  • Take reasonable precautions to keep native fauna separate from domestic animals
  • Abide by training in the rehabilitation of fauna by ensuring fauna is not put on show, passed around or used for show and tell.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Rescuer and Rehabilitation Policy

Permanent Care Wildlife Policy & Procedures

These guidelines are to be read in conjunction with OEH & NPWS Rehabilitation of Fauna policy, 2002 (See extract Appendix A) , and NATFInc General License & Conditions (See extract Appendix B)

“Written proposals justifying the retention of animals on an individual basis, must have the written endorsement of the licensee and be submitted to the local office of the Service where it will be considered on its merits.” General License & Conditions

1. Retention of protected fauna

Background Only in exceptional circumstances will the NPWS permit a privately licensed person or a rehabilitation organisation to permanently retain an unreleasable animal in captivity. Approval may be granted only if the animal will serve as an essential companion animal to others of its species which are undergoing rehabilitation, or will be used as an acceptable resource in a licensed exhibit, or an approved educational or scientific program. Consideration will also be given to the granting of approval to retain some aviary and caged birds, reptiles and frogs. The NPWS may place limitations on the numbers of such animals which may be held and specify conditions under which they should be held. (NPWS Rehabilitation of Fauna policy (2002) Section 26)

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Permanent Care Wildlife Policy & Procedures

Hunter Wildlife Rescue Policies: Wildlife

The policies listed below are for the support of members in relation to wildlife.

Bandicoots, Dasyurids and Native Rodent Rehabilitation Policy

NATF INC Bandicoot/Dasyurids/Native Rodent rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or orphaned wildlife and return all successfully rehabilitated or hand raised fauna to a suitable natural environment. Dasyurids include phascogales, antechinus, and quolls.
Bandicoot, dasyurid and native rodent rehabilitators must demonstrate compliance with the Standards in the OEH Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Protected Fauna (2011) in relation to rescue, transport, assessment, care, husbandry, housing release and euthanasia.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Bandicoot, Dasyurids and Native Rodent Rehabilitation Policy

Bird Rehabilitation Policy

The following Birds Rehabilitation Policy refers to the rehabilitation of all birds, including water birds, sea birds, general birds and raptors and must be read in conjunction with the

  • NPWS Rehabilitation Policy
  • NATF General Licence Conditions and
  • NATF Rescuers’ and Rehabilitators’ Policy (revise 2004)

NATF bird rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or orphaned native birds only and return all successfully rehabilitated or hand raised birds to a suitable natural environment. Bird rehabilitators must demonstrate a commitment to legal and ethically responsible rehabilitation of all birds.

The minimum requirements for the care and rehabilitation of all birds include

1. Completion of the Introduction to the NATF & Basic Rescue workshops
2.  Completion of a NATF approved Bird Rehabilitation training course or equivalent one-on-one approved training.
3.  Be competent in the techniques of wild capture, transport, husbandry and housing.
4. For Birds of Prey, to have completed an approved Raptor Rehabilitation training and meet the NPWS guidelines for Raptor Rehabilitation.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Bird Rehabilitation Policy

Flying Fox Policy

The following policy refers to the rehabilitation of Grey-headed (Pteropus poliocephalm), Little Red (Pteropus scapulatus) and Black (Pteropus alecto) Flying-foxes and must be read in conjunction with the

  • NPWS Rehabilitation Policy
  • NATF General Licence Conditions
  • NATF Rescuers’ and Rehabilitators’ Policy

NATF Flying-fox rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or orphaned flying-foxes and release successfully rehabilitated or hand raised flying-foxes into a suitable colony site or NATF approved release program.

The minimum requirements for the care and rehabilitation of flying-foxes include

  • Completion of the Introduction to the NATF and Basic Rescue workshops
  • Completion of a NATF approved flying-fox rehabilitation training course or equivalent one-on-one training
  • Competence in the techniques of rescue, transport and appropriate handling and housing of sick, injured and orphaned Flying-foxes
  • Undertaking appropriate vaccinations for Australian Bat Lyssavirus
  • Undertaking annual checks of titre levels to ensure adequate cover against ABL

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Flying Fox Rehabilitation Policy

Macropod Policy

NATF macropod rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or orphaned joey macropods and return all successfully rehabilitated or hand raised joey macropods to a suitable natural environment. Macropod rehabilitators must demonstrate a commitment to legal and
ethically responsible rehabilitation of all macropods.

The following Macropod Rehabilitation Policy refers to the rehabilitation of all macropods, and must be read in
conjunction with the

  • NPWS Rehabilitation Policy
  • NATF General Licence Conditions and
  • NATF Rescuers’ and Rehabilitators’ Policy (revise 2004).
  • The Macropology Handbook ‘A Guide to Raising and Releasing Kangaroos and Wallabies’ by Cheryl Dooley, June 2004. Website http://www.ozemail.com.au/~dooleydy/macropology.
  • Species Coordinators responsibilities

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Macropod Policy

Possum and Glider Policy Reviewed 2017

Hunter Wildlife Rescue (NATFINC) Possum and Glider rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or orphaned Possum/Gliders and return successfully rehabilitated or hand raised joey Possum/Gliders to a suitable natural environment.

Possum/Glider rehabilitators must demonstrate compliance with the Standards in the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage policies in relation to rescue, transport, assessment, care, husbandry, housing, release and euthanasia.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Possum & Glider Policy

Possum and Glider Facilities Checklist

The following is a guide to equipment & facilities to assist in providing optimum levels of care and support for animal welfare while in rehabilitation by;

  • Keeping the fauna safe, minimise stress and prevent further injury
  • Ensuring facilities & equipment are well maintained, clean and hygienic
  • Providing fauna with an opportunity to express a range of natural behaviours
  • Ensuring they are separated from household pets

This checklist is intended to be completed by the carer prior to a facilities inspection.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Possum and Glider Facilities Checklist

Reptile Rehabilitation Policy

The following Reptile Rehabilitation Policy refers to the rehabilitation of lizards, monitors and turtles and must be
read in conjunction with the NATF Non-Endemic and Exotic Reptile Policy. Snake rescue and rehabilitation is covered by
the NATF Snake Policy.

The minimum requirements required for the care and rehabilitation of lizards, monitors and turtles include:
1. Training: Have completed Introduction to the NATF & Basic Rescue workshops and a NATF approved Reptile
Rehabilitation training course or one-on-one approved training and be competent in the techniques of wild capture, transport, husbandry and housing.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Reptile Rehabilitation Policy

Wombat Policy

NATF wombat rehabilitators are authorised to hold, for the purpose of rehabilitation, sick, injured or
orphaned joey wombats and return all successfully rehabilitated or hand raised joey wombats to a
suitable natural environment. Wombat rehabilitators must demonstrate a commitment to legal and
ethically responsible rehabilitation of all wombats.

The following Wombat Rehabilitation Policy refers to the rehabilitation of all Wombats, and must be read in
conjunction with the

  • NPWS Rehabilitation Policy
  • NATF General Licence Conditions
  • NATF Rescuers’ and Rehabilitators’ Policy (revise 2004) and
  • Species Coordinators responsibilities.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Wombat-Policy-2010.pdf

NSW Office of Environment & Heritage Policies and Practice Guidelines

Hunter Wildlife Rescue operates is accordance with policies and procedures from NSW Office of Environment, Climate Change & Water (previously Office of Environment & Heritage) and National parks & Wildlife Services. These are a selection of some policies to assist member of Hunter Wildlife Rescue. Members can view these and other policies from their website.

Here a link if you would like to visit the website https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/topics/animals-and-plants/wildlife-management/wildlife-policies-and-guidelines

For additional information about the code of practice for various native animals click on the link https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/Research-and-publications/Publications-search?search=code%20of%20practice

NSW Wildlife Council Inc Firearms Safety Brief

Introduction

The aim of this firearms safety brief is to provide a safe operating environment for both NSW Wildlife Council (NWC) member group volunteers and members of the public when it is necessary to euthanase an injured animal using a firearm.

This brief must be used in conjunction with other instructions and guidelines governing animal rescue, communications and codes of practice. The brief is intended for new firearms licence
applicants as part of their application to obtain a NSW Firearms Licence or Permit. The brief may also be used for ongoing refresher training.

The NWC Firearms Safety Brief is to be completed in addition to the NSW Firearms Registry Firearms Licence Qualification Course.

The focus of this brief is on shooting principles and safety. It addresses all aspects of safe working practices to ensure that NWC members provide as safe an environment as possible for wildlife volunteers and members of the public.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

NSW Wildlife Council Firearms Safety Brief

NSW Police Firearms Registry

Application:

This policy applies to wildlife (fauna) rehabilitators making application for a firearms licence for the genuine reason of Animal Welfare – Owner, Transporter, Drover or Other Handler of Animals.

Policy:

Individuals who hold or are authorised under a general licence issued to a Fauna Rehabilitation Organisation under section 120 of the NPW Act which permits the person to harm protected fauna for a specified purpose may make application for a firearms licence for the genuine reason of Animal Welfare – Owner, Transporter, Drover or Other Handler of Animals.

Evidence must be provided that the person has been approved by the Fauna Rehabilitation Organisation to shoot animals, consistent with any Code of Practice that applies and the individual has an active role in the fauna rehabilitation organisation.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

NSW Police Firearms Registry

Procedural Guidelines for Rescue & Rehabilitation of Oiled Wildlife

1.1 Introduction

Major oil spills have occurred, and will continue to occur, in Australia and other parts of the world. In 2000, the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) commissioned a risk assessment of pollution in Australian waters which indicated Newcastle, Botany Bay andSydney ports as relatively high risk, while other areas along the NSW coast indicated relatively low risk.

A major spill is most likely to come from ships en route to and from ports, crude oil refineries or storage and docking facilities. In the event of a major spill it is likely that large numbers of wildlife, mostly seabirds but including marine mammals and turtles, will beaffected.

In the event of a spill, the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service will be requested by the relevant combat agency (which is determined by the location of the spill) via the Agricultural and Animal Services Functional Area Coordinator to:

  • manage the rescue and rehabilitation of oiled wildlife;
  • provide advice on sensitive areas to be protected from the spill and also potential damage
  • resulting from clean-up operations, and;
  • provide a wildlife liaison officer to the Incident Control Centre.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Procedural Guidelines for the Rescue and Rehabilitation of Oiled Wildlife

Office of Environment, Climate Change & Water Rehabilitation of Protected Fauna Policy

Introduction

• The Director-General of the Department of Environment, Climate Change and Water (DECCW) has a legislative responsibility for the protection and care of fauna (National Parks and Wildlife Act, 1974, s. 92).
• The Director-General of DECCW may enter into arrangements for the carrying out of such works as the Director-General considers necessary for the protection and care of fauna (NPW Act s. 8(7)(b)).

Scope and Application

This policy applies to the rescue, rehabilitation and release of all injured, sick and orphaned protected fauna in NSW.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Rehabilitation of Protected Fauna

Code of practice for Injured, Sick & Orphaned Flying Foxes

Preface

The Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Flying-foxes (the Code) is intended for everyone authorised by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) to rehabilitate and release flying-foxes. To protect the welfare of animals and help conserve the wild flying-fox population, the Code contains both standards and guidelines for the care of flying-foxes. It is designed to be read in conjunction with the Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Protected Fauna (OEH 2011) – see http://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/resources/ wildlifelicences/110004FaunaRehab.pdf.

Grey-headed flying-foxes Pteropus poliocephalus are listed as vulnerable under the NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 and the Commonwealth Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999. Black flying-foxes, P. alecto, and little red flyingfoxes, P. scapulatus, are not threatened, but are protected species under the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NPW Act).

Compliance with the standards in the Code is a condition of licences issued under s. 120 of the NPW Act, to rehabilitate and release sick, injured and orphaned protected fauna. Failure to comply with a licence condition is an offence under s. 133 of the NPW Act, and may result in a penalty infringement notice being issued or a prosecution being commenced.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Code of Practice for Sick and Orphaned Flying-Foxes

Office of Environment & Heritage Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Koalas

Preface
The Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Koalas (the Code) is intended for anyone authorised by the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) to
rehabilitate and release koalas (Phascolarctos cinereus). It has been developed to protect the welfare of koalas in care and for the conservation of wild koala
populations. The Code contains both standards and guidelines for the care of koalas and is designed to be read in conjunction with the Code of Practice for Injured, Sick
and Orphaned Protected Fauna (OEH 2011).

Koalas are listed as vulnerable under the Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995. The koala population in the Pittwater Local Government Area and in the Hawks Nest and Tea Gardens areas are listed as endangered.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Koalas

Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Birds of Prey

The Code of Practice for Sick, Injured and Orphaned Birds of Prey (the Code) is designed for everyone trained in the activity of rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing birds of prey. It has been developed to protect the welfare of birds of prey in care, and to contribute to the conservation of birds of prey in the wild. The Code is designed to be read in conjunction with the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Protected Fauna (General Code).

Compliance with the Code does not remove the need to abide by the requirements of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NPW Act), Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979, NSW Threatened Species Conservation Act 1995 or any other relevant laws and regulations.

The Code contains standards and guidelines for the care of birds of prey that are incapable of fending for themselves in their natural habitat. Compliance with the standards is a condition of licences to rehabilitate and release sick, injured and orphaned protected fauna issued under section 120 of the NPW Act. Failure to comply with a licence condition is an offence under section 133 of the NPW Act and may result in a penalty infringement notice or prosecution.

The Code has been prepared by a number of wildlife rehabilitation groups working in consultation with specialist wildlife veterinarians and OEH. Groups involved in the preparation of the Code include For Australian Wildlife Needing Aid Inc NSW (FAWNA), Looking After Our Kosciuszko Orphans Inc (LAOKO), Native Animal Trust Fund Inc, Northern Rivers Wildlife Carers Inc, Tweed Valley Wildlife Carers, Wildcare Queanbeyan Inc, NSW Wildlife Information, Rescue and Education Service Inc (WIRES), and Wildlife Rescue South Coast Inc.

The Code is neither a complete manual on animal husbandry, nor a static document. It will be revised from time to time to take into account new knowledge of animal physiology and behaviour, technological advances, developments in standards of animal welfare and changing community attitudes and expectations about the humane treatment of birds of prey.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Birds of Prey

Guidelines for the Rehabilitation of Birds of Prey

Introduction

The eagles, kites, hawks, falcons and owls, that are collectively known as birds of prey, or raptors, rely on their agility, stealth, speed and strength to locate and, in most cases, to capture their prey.

Relatively minor injuries, such as bruising or damage to flight or tail feathers, would not seriously impede or jeopardise the survival of most types of birds in the wild, but any injury suffered by a raptor can be life threatening. Studies have shown that falcons and goshawks, for example, may be successful, on average, in only one in about every seven attempts to catch prey. As this group of birds relies, more than any other, on their fitness to be able to capture their next feed, so the question must be asked “What chance does an injured, or unfit, raptor have of acquiring its next
feed if it is not near to 100% fit?” It is obvious that the rehabilitation of raptors requires very special techniques and the rehabilitator must have very special skills and facilities to give the bird a better than fair chance of survival when it is returned to the wild.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Guidelines for the Rehabilitation of Birds of Prey

Office of Environment & Heritage Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Wombats

1. Preface

The Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Wombats (the Code) is designed for everyone involved in the activity of rescuing, rehabilitating and releasing wombats. It has been developed to protect the welfare of wombats in care and to contribute to the conservation of wild wombat populations. The Code is designed to be read in conjunction with the Office of Environment and Heritage (OEH) Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Protected Fauna.

Compliance with the Code does not remove the need to abide by the requirements of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1974 (NPW Act), Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act 1979. Threatened Species Conservation Act or any other relevant laws and regulations.

The Code contains both standards, which are enforceable, and guidelines, which describe recommended approaches for the care of wombats that are incapable of fending for themselves in their natural habitat. Compliance with the standards is a condition of licences to rehabilitate and release sick, injured and orphaned protected fauna issued under Section 120 of the NPW Act. Failure to comply with a licence condition is an offence under the Section 133 of the NPW Act and may result in a Penalty Infringement Notice or prosecution.

The Code has been produced by the NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Code of Practice for Injured, Sick and Orphaned Wombats

Management of Native Birds that Show Aggression to People

Introduction

In several Australian native bird species, aggressive behaviour is associated with the protection of nest sites. Seasonal attacks, often during spring, by aggressive birds, can be intimidating and may result in injuries to people as a consequence of direct physical contact with the bird. Potential injuries can include a scratch on the scalp or face caused by the bird’s beak or foot, or an accident such as a child falling off a bicycle, or
a postman on a motorcycle running into a fence in reaction to a swooping bird.

The NPWS receives numerous phone calls and requests for assistance each year about interactions between people and aggressively acting native birds (including, but not limited to, magpies, butcherbirds, currawongs, kookaburras, magpie larks, and lapwings (plovers)).

The community has an expectation that the NPWS, as the State’s wildlife agency will respond in situations where conflict occurs. Genuine effort by NPWS officers to deliver effective wildlife management provides a significant benefit to community relations and will enhance the public profile of this organisation.

The above is an extract ONLY – to read the full policy click on the link below to download the policy.

Management of Native Birds that Show Aggression to People